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community and the attacks are impossible for the federal law enforcement community to stop. so how to make ourselves more resilient? the steps we need to take are not that sexy. we need to upgrade our transit systems and infrastructure so as to make them less vulnerable to attacks. for example, flynn notes the u.s. navy has invested more in protecting the single port of san diego that is home to the pacific fleet than the department of homeland security has invest ed in the ports of ls angeles, long beach, san francisco, oakland, seattle, and tacoma combined, upon which a bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack, which is still the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure that the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it's easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope that in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column
the center of the investigation, where all of the different law enforcement agencies are gathering. that's where the medical tent was and is now turned into the headquarters as it were of the investigation. right next to me you can also see that as the marathoners have left, the international media and national media moved in. these folks from fuji television in japan. also folks here from german television, i have also spoken to folks from latin american television. reporter from colombia. obviously this has become a national/international event. and i also did get a chance earlier this evening off to talk to folks who have the vantage point of being right there, right in front of the blast scene by the finish line. let's hear what they had to say. >> suddenly this big explosion took place in front of me. and then i saw this cloud, big cloud, with smoke. and my first instinct was to run across the street and start helping out the people. >> your sleeve there is that blood on your sleeve? >> my pants. my clothes. >> show me the flag. >> that was the flag i was holding the whole type. thi
happened including american support for -- as a law enforcement and intelligence practitioner is inclusiveness in america. as a law enforcement tool, i worried all along when i was in the business that americans would start to say as a result of events like this that there are real americans and other americans. that kind of mentality if we ever get it will accelerate i think these cases of radicalization. kids like this when they take the oath will say i took the oath but i'm still not accepted. >> to what exstent one of the dangers here? one can overread too much. these may be two cases of a bad situation. to what extent might be assimilation machine in the u.s. be broken down or not functioning as well as it used to. in europe, minority communities were excluded marginalized but not in the united states. the polling data suggests that. but does this tell us maybe we should pay attention to that? >> compared to what? the assimilation mod until the united states works marvelously compared to france or germany or great britain. if you look back in history, the irish, the jews,
appropriate law enforcement resources to protect our citizens and investigate and to respond to this attack. obviously our first thoughts this morning are with the victims. their families and the city of boston. explosionst two gravely wounded dozens of americans and took the lives of others, including a 8-year-old boy. this was a heinous and cowardly act and given what we now know about what took place, the f.b.i.'s investigating it as an act of terrorism. any time bombs are used to target innocent civilians, it is an act of terror. what we don't yet know, however, is who carried out this attack or why, whether it was planned and executed by a terrorist organization, foreign or domestic, or was the act of a malevolent individual. that's what we don't yet know. and clearly we're at the beginning of our investigation. it will take time to follow every lead and determine what happened. but we will find out. we will find whoever harmed our citizens and we will bring them to justice. we also know this, the american people refuse to be terrorized. because what the world saw yesterday, in the aft
the nation's immigration laws gathered at capitol hill yesterday to put pressure on lawmakers. >> make sure that they hear from you. that they know without a doubt in their mind that keeping their jobs depends on them supporting comprehensive immigration reform. >> what we're seeing right now is an incredible amount of support, both from the left and from the right. >> the new proposal also puts millions of illegal immigrants on a path to citizenship. but only if they arrived in the u.s. before the end of 2011. those who have been charged with crimes, would not be eligible. >>> president obama will host south korea's newly elected first female president at the white house next month. they will observe the 60th anniversary of the alliance between the u.s. and south korea. also high on their agenda, efforts to counter the nuclear threat posed by north korea. >>> in venezuela, demand for a recount in the presidential election. ballots were ignored leading to an anti-government protest. the election results were certified. the winner by a razor thin margin less than one percentage point hand-pi
is scheduled to travel to boston on thursday and attend an interfaith service as police and other law enforcement remain on high alert. >>> the stories of those who died are coming to light. those killed include an 8-year- old, martin richards. he was a spectator at the race along with his parents, father and sister. also killed crystal campbell of arlington. she's being remembered for her generous spirit. crystal had been going to watch the marathon since she was a little girl. the third victim was a gradual student. she was from china. the consulate refused to release her name at the request of her family. crystal's mother struggled with her emotions as she remembered a woman who was full of life. >> she was always smiling. i can't believe this is happening. she was such a hard worker at everything she did. this doesn't make any sense. >> reporter: third grader martin richard recently celebrated his first communion. richard's mother and younger sisters are also hospitalized tonight. neighbors say the mother suffered a serious brain injury and the 6-year-old sister lost her leg. in a
an interfaith service as police and other law enforcement remain on high alert. >>> the stories of those who died are coming to light. those killed include an 8-year- old, martin richards. he was a spectator at the race along with his parents, father and sister. also killed crystal campbell of arlington. she's being remembered for her generous spirit. crystal had been going to watch the marathon since she was a little girl. the third victim was a gradual student. she was from china. the consulate refused to release her name at the request of her family. crystal's mother struggled with her emotions as she remembered a woman who was full of life. >> she was always smiling. i can't believe this is happening. she was such a hard worker at everything she did. this doesn't make any sense. >> reporter: third grader martin richard recently celebrated his first communion. richard's mother and younger sisters are also hospitalized tonight. neighbors say the mother suffered a serious brain injury and the 6-year-old sister lost her leg. in all, 176 people were injured. most have been treated and release
tobacco from 18 to 21. the new law would not prohibit people under 21 from possessing or smoking cigarettes. if passed, the measure would be the strictest limit on tobacco of any u.s. city. awesome. >> you kind of wonder when the mayor is going to pass a law that is going to require each new yorker to read at least 30 minutes of poetry. >> no. this is good. >> that one i would not expect to happen. >> this is what we need. we actually don't even need anybody buying or smoking cigarettes and getting sick from it and getting other people sick too. >> mika, can i point something out? >> sure. >> the matrix awards yesterday. women in communications. mike barnicle's wife introduced by mika brzezinski. >> oh, look at her. mika did a great job. and you know, ann did pretty damn well herself. >> ann was amazing. there's martha stewart. there were impressive women there. but i had the great honor of -- this is funny. i had the great honor of introducing ann. and they asked at one point for last year's matrix winners to stand up and barnicle stood up. >> i was wondering when mike barnicle
experts the authority still need the public's help. it is incumbent upon all of los private residence, law- enforcement fire service etc. to be vigilant and be aware and communicate with one another. >> it has been said many times but it certainly bears repeating. security experts urging people to be aware of your surroundings. especially in these areas the not heavily trafficked. you have to keep your eyes and ears open. people with their smart phones walking around in not being aware of what is happening around them. authorities asking people to be alert and be aware of your surroundings. that is the absolute best thing we can do to prevent a tragedy. >> bombings in boston will not stop the chicago marathon from taking place. >> and was unexpected and unprecedented. >> within the span of about 15 seconds to explosions changed the world of marathon running forever. >> we were not sure what happened. we just knew that there was an explosion near the finish line. took part in the boston marathon. >> she finessed about an hour before the explosion. the act of terror was truly terrifying. all
laws that prevent that. organizations -- about whetherns there have been improvements generally within the afghan government and specifically related to united states contracts for goods and services? >> the n.e.a. that allowed the u.s. to cease contracting with the enemy was very helpful. if you had indication with a contractor or subcontractor was associated with the enemy we could immediately stop that contract. i read the recent investigator general of a chemist and's report, how to take that legislation further. i absolutely support that. it would expand that be on the department of defense so other u.s. government agencies could also have the same authorities we have been given as a result of that very helpful legislation, and also to address a different level of contracts in the past have been over $100,000. as would bring it down to a level below that. i do think we have had some improvement in that particular area as a result of that legislation. continuing to move in that direction would be very helpful. >> thank you. one last question. thechairman asked you about afghan inte
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)